Chapter 8 Summary: From Band-aids to Birds-Eye

There were many interesting events that took place during this time period such as band aids being introduced in 1920, Russia has a revolution, and Second Narrows Bridge is built (I have to be honest but I just love the way we see the progress that Canada makes and sometimes wish we talk more about it). However, one subject that did catch my attention was Tatlin’s Tower because since I’ve been attending school, I have been wondering for the longest time what this tower is that is built on top of one of the buildings on campus. In class I sit right next to the window and I constantly have a habit of looking outside so, every time I do look, all I see is the tower. But, after learning about the tower in class, I finally understood where the concept came from.

Tatlin’s Tower was monumental building that was supposed to be placed in Petrograd (St. Petersburg), but sadly, it was never built. Designed by architect Vladimir Tatlin, the monument followed a Constructivist architectural style that was to be built from iron, glass, and steel while trying to symbolize modernity. It was planned and designed to surpass the Eiffel Tower in height (the tower was supposed to be 400m or 1,312ft) and also wanted to challenge them with their idea of modernity.

One thing that really interested me was that the tilt of this tower is the same as Earth (23.5 degrees) which is why I think it’s why many people had doubts when it wanted to be built. But overall, just one question remains for me: who built the same tower on campus and why did they do it?

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